The LoCo Experience

EXPERIENCE 70 | Patrick & Janay Soukup, Soukup Real Estate Services, Olympic Medalist

July 04, 2022 Ethan Lee Season 2 Episode 70
The LoCo Experience
EXPERIENCE 70 | Patrick & Janay Soukup, Soukup Real Estate Services, Olympic Medalist
Show Notes Transcript

Patrick is the Owner of Soukup Real Estate, a real estate firm here in Fort Collins and Janay is a two time Olympian with a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics in London. 

We talk about Patrick's journey in real estate investment management and his business Soukup Real Estate. We also discuss Janay's experience in the Olympics and illustrate the challenges she went through.  

They have an inspiring story about hard work and building relationships in life. I had a a great time with these two and I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did. 

Curt:

Today's episode of the LoCo experience podcast was with Patrick and Jenay Soukup. Patrick is the owner of Soukup real estate, a five person brokerage and real estate firm here in Fort Collins. And Jenay is a two time Olympian with a bronze medal at the 2012 Olympics in London. And so this is a more personal journey than most. We talk about their early relationship. We talk about Olympic training. We talk about real estate investment management. We talk about getting divorced and getting remarried again a few years later. And, uh, really these two are. Both some of my favorite people in town they're authentic, they're caring, they're kind and Jenay is so humble for as accomplished as she is in the athletic background. So, um, listening for a great episode, a little change of pace a little bit, and I hope you enjoy this with Patrick and Jenay welcome back to the Loco experience podcast. And I'm honored today to be joined by Patrick Soukup Owner of sup real estate, broker, owner of sup real estate and Jana sup and Jana is his wife as well as occupational therapist and a mom of three. Yeah, mm-hmm And, uh, thanks for joining us here today. Um, I'm gonna start with, uh, just telling a story. Uh, Patrick, you, we talked recently on your podcast about when we first met. Do you wanna share with our listeners? Was that your first entrepreneurial venture?

Patrick:

Uh, was it, it was not my first, no, I had, I had actually flipped a couple homes with a couple partners prior to that. And also ran a, you know, a large acreage field mowing business when I was a freshman and sophomore. But after that, you, you get kind of bit, you know, you get bit by that bug. Yeah. Of man, this is kind of cool to create something. So started designated scooters in my entrepreneurship class at CSU. And, uh, you know, it's kind of funny looking back at it now, I'd say we were the Uber before Uber, but get your trunk all gasoline and, uh, dirty with a folding, with a folding scooter from

Curt:

Italy. So do I understand that you, um, wrote like a business plan in entrepreneurship class first and you're like, let's do

Patrick:

this. Yeah, yeah. I wrote it and I. Well, you know, shoot let's let's let's see. What's what it's got going. I think, I think one of the things that I hate is all talk. No, do you know? So tried it out and that's, you know, how you and I met really? It is

Curt:

totally it's down in old town square. You were, uh, looking for drunk people at home so, and we found them, how many, how many trips do you think you made?

Patrick:

Uh, probably over a hundred. Yeah. You know, uh, not much

Curt:

it enough to know that you didn't really wanna do that for a living very long. Yeah,

Patrick:

there was, uh, we had kind of a, um, an every Thursday client, we had a standing client every Thursday night when, and Jana lived on the Southeast side of town and this guy lived at way north on Ontario lake. And it was only a couple trips at negative degrees driving a scooter back south, you know, and taking two hours to get back home that I was like, this is not worth a 35 bucks that I just charged. Right.

Curt:

And today, tell me about your point in life at that time.

Janey:

Um, we were dating at the time and I actually helped him out a couple of times, uh, at least go get the scooter and

Patrick:

kind of help him out. Cuz he was too, I'm not gonna make it home. Baby flat tire

Janey:

he was too cold and I was like, here, I got some warmest for you and stuff. So yeah, we were, we were dating kind of in the thick of things, um, for us.

Curt:

And were you like in the thick of your athletic career at that time as well? I was,

Janey:

I was, I was just kind of getting going really. Um, what year was that in 20? That

Patrick:

would've been AF that would've been the start of your masters. So

Janey:

yeah, so it was right before I really got, um, you know, I guess well known in the track and field world, but, um, it was, uh, a good experience for both of us with like designated scooters

Curt:

for sure. And so, uh, would you share with our listeners, um, you've got some pretty spectacular achievements in your athletic career. Can you, uh, like just. Tip that, uh, punchline at the end, like, do you win some national championships? You were an Olympian more than once or one time?

Janey:

Yeah, I'm a two time Olympian Uhhuh. Um, I went to the 2012 Olympics in London and there I, in the long jump, I won the bronze medal. Nice. And I also went to the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janei and didn't metal there, but great experience.

Curt:

Yeah. Yeah. And like how long is a long jump? how

Janey:

long, how far do you jump? Oh, my furthest is 23 feet. Three inches.

Curt:

that's awesome. Mm-hmm how long have you jumped before Patrick? Not that far. No. No, because you guys were track athletes. Is that how you met? Is that right?

Janey:

Yep. He's a high jumper.

That

Curt:

was a long jumper in school. Oh, well then you could have your little, should be able to both jump far in high, possibly. Yeah. There isn't really a contest for that though. Is there

Patrick:

Yeah, not at this time, at least

Curt:

so this is gonna be a podcast where we really talk about a, a life journey a lot, as well as, um, a business journey here with, with your real estate business, Patrick, and to do so properly. I think we've gotta like jump in the time machine and go back to like third grade, um, Jene, why don't I start with you? What, what was your family re we mentioned that you were an air force brat when we were chatting just earlier, but what was that elementary school experience for you? Where were you at then?

Janey:

Oh, I was in Utah. Okay. Or elementary school. So, um, I'd spent four years there and. We were, you know, just out there, my dad was, uh, doing, he was a chief of weapons and all that. So he used to come home and say, you know, guess what I did today. And I'd be like, what'd you do? And he's like, if I tell you, I have to kill you. And so he was, um,

Curt:

so is he an officer career,

Janey:

career, air force? No, he, he was there for 30 years though. He was, he put in 30 years. Yeah. So.

Curt:

yeah. And blew up lots of stuff along the way for practice. I'm sure he did. and did you have a big family?

Janey:

I had two brothers. I have an older brother. Who's four years older than me and a younger brother. Who's nine years. Okay. Younger than me.

Curt:

So, and, uh, tell me about young Janay. Were you athletic already as a youngster? And all the things

Janey:

I was, my first love really was gymnastics and oh, um, I never even had any, uh, Olympic aspirations and as a gymnast, but I was, I was fairly good. I got into really? Yeah. As a young athlete, I was, um, you know, in level 10 and you're kind

Curt:

of big for gymnasts these days that are all so tiny anymore. Yeah.

Janey:

Yeah. When you do, you know, gymnastics for that long, you don't, it kind of stunts your growth a little bit. You actually don't. Oh, is that right? Very

Patrick:

tall.

Curt:

You land too many times and stuff. Yeah. You don't grow as tall. Well, I'm glad you didn't stick with it, but so, uh, then from there, like when did you get into the track sports?

Janey:

Um, I tried it out in eighth grade. I, I mean, basically it was, you know, my friends were doing it, so I wanted to do it too. And, um, I just kind of jumped in there. I didn't know anything about track really, other than you just run. So that was

Curt:

actually my first time running track as well. I broke my arm in eighth grade basketball and to try to stay in shape for next season, I was like, well, I guess I'll run track since I missed my basketball season this year. Mm-hmm I ran the mile because I was really slow at sprinting and basically like, well, he's slow in the short stuff. Maybe he could run a mile. I don't know. We need a, we need

Patrick:

somebody to fill this gap over here. Right.

Curt:

We don't have anybody else that will run a mile. Yeah. So anyway, that's me. Um, so one of the things I was thinking of was how do you learn what they're good at as you like tryouts and things like that. I'm, I'm from like rural places where you could be on the team, if you want to.

Janey:

Um, it's basically the same thing, like track and field, isn't the most popular sport in any school. Right. So they kind of get anybody who will do, you know, whatever, and then they, you just try everything. And so, um, I happened to dry high jump and some sprints and long jump and, and like them all. So, yeah.

Curt:

So were you pretty strong in many different? I was competition levels

Janey:

then. Yeah. Mm-hmm yeah. High jump. I was actually pretty good. I think in eighth grade I jumped five, three, and. I don't, I didn't do much of it after that. It was good enough

Curt:

to beat most of the girls in that competition. Yep. and, uh, then did you come to CSU as like a scholarship track athlete then?

Janey:

Yep. I was stationed up in Alaska and was recruited by some of the coaches here. Okay. And I was looking for a home away from home. And so when I, you know, got here and saw the team and saw how, you know, closeknit, they were, I was like, oh, this is the place for me. So that's, I ended up at CSU.

Curt:

Okay. Had some interviews and different things. So talk to me about like, how many stops on your journey. You mentioned just now you were in Alaska, by that time you were in Utah. How many places did you live along the way? Uh, I was

Janey:

born in Florida, so we were out in tend air force base there. Um, we lived there for seven and then Utah for four. Oh, and then, um, or excuse me, five and then Alaska for four. Oh, that's too bad. Yeah. Yeah. So not like a lot of military families it's every two years. So we were actually,

Curt:

so you were able to develop some good friendships and things and had stable schools and stuff. Mm-hmm And so, Patrick, um, let's catch you up to date here. Um, do you remember your third grade? Teacher's. Oh, gosh,

Patrick:

no, I do not, but I went to, I was going to St. Joseph's at that time. Okay.

Curt:

Um, yeah, just down the street

Patrick:

from my house. Yeah. Raise raised, uh, Catholic and, uh, then went to Cruz in fifth grade because my mom was concerned that, you know, middle school kids can be mean. So she wanted me to make friends before I got

Curt:

to didn't wanna be coming outta Catholic school and whatever.

Patrick:

Yeah, exactly. So, um, but yeah, then. You know, Fort Collins, Lampkins go. Lampkins nice. Nice. And, uh, uh, we'll see where our kids go. If we, you know, the plan is to stay in Fort Collins. Yeah. But, you know, we'll see where they're, where they're gonna go. Cuz currently we're in the fossil Ridge school district and um, and then kind of, that's a little ways out though. It is quite a ways out, but, but fast too, you know, shoot, you know, Noah's already four and she starts preschool next year and it's just like, man, it does. I don't wanna be that, you know, it goes by fast, but it, it has gone by pretty quick.

Curt:

Yeah. So, so, um, you're you were a track athlete as well. Were you scholarship as well at CSU? No.

Patrick:

My, I started track way late. I mean, I, I did it in like, or, you know, middle school and everything like that, but like not anything competitively. I was, you know, I was a basketball player myself. Yeah. And. Uh, you know, I was very, I was in my opinion, athletic until I met Jena and understood, oh, this is what, that's what I thought like, looks like. Yeah, exactly. But I, I could jump and I, you know, I, I could dunk, you know, all the way throughout high school. And it was one of those things where I was like, ah, you know, I wanna, uh, work on my, you know, jumping even more. So I went out to be a high jumper, ended up being pretty good, but then had an injury. And so the scholarships that I were was talking to kind of went out the window and so chose CSU. I applied to CSU, April of my senior year in high school. So like, it was like a last minute, like, I guess my I'm not gonna heal for my injury, so I'll go to CSU and

Curt:

yeah. So that's where I went. At least I can be here. Um, tell me about your kind of growing up years. Were you basketball players through high school then? And

Patrick:

yeah, that was kind of the main, um, that was what I, I mainly focused on was basketball. That's what my, my main love, but I was better at track. Yeah. You know, I just do you play now still. Not anymore. My knees are trash. And if I go play just once I'm feeling it for like the next four

Curt:

days, it's annoying. Yeah. Yeah. I'm feeling, yeah, it's a, I like basketball as well, but it is, and it's too violent for old guys like me. I mean, you're bigger and stronger. At least you knock people over instead of them knocking you over. Like I get man, but

Patrick:

I agree. Yeah. The older you get the aches and creeks and just even from waking up my shoulder hurts. you know, I slept on it wrong.

Curt:

And what was your family background? Do you have

Patrick:

brothers, sisters too? Uh, yep. I have an older sister, uh, and a younger sister. Um, the one, the younger lives in Windsor and the older lives in Hackston Colorado. So it's small

Curt:

world. Cause your mom was a single mom for.

Patrick:

Um, portion of the time. Yes, she was, uh, my, I, I guess my older sister is my half sister and then, uh, she, but my dad basically raised her from a very, very early age mm-hmm and, um, but yeah, then, then my mom and dad were together through high school and, um, separated when I was, when I got into, uh, college. Oh, I see. Okay. Yep. So, um, raised that way. And then I went to CSU and stayed in Fort Collins since that time, but yeah.

Curt:

So, um, what did you think when you moved to Fort Collins? Jenay? Um, was it, I guess probably. And if you were in Utah and Alaska, you were used to white bread city already.

Janey:

Yeah. Wasn't anything new for me. Um, it was a college town, um, kind of the, what I expected,

Curt:

so yeah, yeah. Was that the coach that set the culture for the team or just a tradition of closeness and things

Janey:

like that. Yeah. I think what they were looking for when they were kind of searching out athletes or athletes that would fit into their culture. And so I was, you know, I fit right in and I liked, you know, their, the way they were like the jumpers hung out with the sprinters, the sprinters hung out with the throwers. And so that's why I was looking for was that community. Yeah. And so it was easy for me to just kind of ball right into that. So

Curt:

like for people that haven't ever been a collegiate athlete, like talk to me about like what that lifestyle looks like, because I know that there's like, you have to have classes and stuff yet. Right. But you have to spend probably hours a day training. Mm-hmm things like that. Practice both by yourself and with others. What's that grind look

Janey:

like. I mean, it's pretty straightforward, but you really just have to have discipline. You have to make sure that you, you get your classes done and, you know, good grades cuz you can't even run. And if you don't have the grades to, to run, um, it is student athlete, which is what our coach always told us. Like you have to have your grades or you're not gonna be running. Yeah. Um, but yeah, it was about discipline and, and everything was just timed. Like you have classes, make sure you get to your classes, make sure you get to practice. Make sure you get to wait. Um, and busy. Pretty busy. Yeah. You know, you have to make sure you take your test before you leave, you know, for a track meet or something like that. Sure. Make sure you turn in papers. And so it's, it's busy, but um, doable. Definitely doable. Yeah.

Curt:

Yeah. And you guys met that first year, freshman year. Were you a so. No senior, senior whoa, older woman. I didn't realize it was that much older. Yeah. I'm three years older than him. So what, let we'll talk about the family and maybe a little more of the love story, but talk to me about like how a freshman do like Patrick, about a senior track question. Fair question.

Janey:

It's fair question. I was actually there with the coach that was, um, checking to see if he had any, what we call bunnies, if he had any hops to do high jump. And so I was there the day he tried out. Okay. And so I watched him and I'm a coach consulted with me and we kind of decided, yeah, he might be, he has some

Curt:

potential. He's been working on his, uh, you had rehab for quite a while. Was it a injury related to jumping or? It

Patrick:

was, I, I injured myself between my junior and senior year in high school and my, my hamstring. And that's when all the scholarships kind of went out the window that I was talking to. And then I went and actually I tried out for the CSU basketball team and I was the last, this was when, uh, Tim miles was still there. Oh, really? He took on

Curt:

three. He came from North Dakota. Yeah. My Alma mater. Yeah. Those sons of bitches at CSU stole them from

Patrick:

us. And then he went away to Nebraska, but you know, he had a, a tryout. They, they took three and I was the fourth and which was a, you know, looking back on it, a great, a great thing. Um, but I felt good. And so I was like, I called my high school coach and I just said, Hey, I, I feel pretty good. Like, I, you, can you get me a tryout with CSU? I, I think I could actually jump again. Yeah. And so he did and, uh, went out and tried out and that's when, you know, Jenay was, was there watching it and didn't know, you know, didn't know her from anything, you know, Chuck is a small, it's a small community, but

Curt:

I didn't, you hadn't really been in it for a while. Right. And especially on the women's side.

Patrick:

Yeah. And, and, and I, I would say I'm very open minded and, but, you know, maybe the coach just kind of came to me between jumps, cuz I think Jenay made a comment or uh, uh, encouragement or something. And, and maybe I, I shrugged it off or maybe I did some, I don't know what the, what the reasoning behind it was, but the coach came up to me. He said, You're talking to a two time All-American you might wanna listen and so I, I, I was like, holy shit, you know, and, uh, or I don't know exactly what he was, how many, I don't know how many time All-American Jenay was, but significant amount and, you know, kind of the leader of the team. Yeah. And he's like, you need, you probably need to listen to her.

Curt:

So, so Jene you're about as humble as any highly accomplished person. I know, but like, were you a leader of the team because of your performance? Were you a leader of the team because you listened and you were humble and kind to everybody, or what, talk to young people, especially about, you know, being a leader, even if you're kind of the quiet and humble type.

Janey:

Yeah. Um, I think it was a combination of both, you know, I was, uh, good at what I was doing. Still wasn't the best. And I think my dad telling me one piece of advice was in, at high, in high school at the state meet for long jump. He always told me, um, just remember, even if you win this competition, there's always someone better than you. Hmm. And so that's humbling in of itself. And, you know, I never took a disrespect for my dad or anything, but it was like, it was encouraging. Yeah. And it always made me feel like, you know, I'm not the best. And so how can I brag and, you know, come about and say, oh, look at me macho. Um, and there still be someone way better than me. So, um, just kind of realizing that, you know, there's always a lot of work to put in when you're doing a sport and having to work hard and having discipline and, um, you know, putting your nose to the ground and grinding is, is super important.

Curt:

So, yeah. So was it, uh, like. instant attraction action here, or what was, uh, what, like talk about this developing you made the team, obviously.

Patrick:

Yeah. Yeah. You know, I think, um, I, I didn't think I stood a chance in hell, you know, I'm this, this goofy white boy, red head, you know, skinny, still my boy body at that point, you know, like, right. Uh, and she's this fi fifth year senior quite, quite accomplished athlete, but we were warming up and, um, you know, there was just the one thing that Jenay is, is, you know, um, is like you said, very humble. She doesn't care if you're a, a freshman, she doesn't care who you are. You know what you're gonna do. She's gonna talk to you like a human. And yeah. You know, I was talking with a buddy of mine and she kind of jumped into the conversation and, you know, it was kind of something nerdy and we kind of bantered back and forth a little bit at that point. And then, uh, she made a comment to me that you. Uh, when we were getting into the, the cold, the ice tub. Oh yeah. and she likes to tell that one, but what, you know what let's hear it. What'd you say? Yeah, he

Janey:

was, he was getting in the hot tub, you know, so he takes everything off. So you could see everything really at the end of the day, but he hits red hair and he had bright blue eyes. And I was like, oh man. And so I decided to tell him, Hey, you're pretty good looking for a redhead And his response was silence he said nothing to me. He said nothing at all.

Curt:

Sorry. Were you just like embarrassed

Patrick:

or were you just, I mean, I like, I was like, literally like in like my slider, so pretty much nothing on and just about to hop in the hot tub or, you know, the ice tub and, you know, I think, I, I know I had a crush on her. Right. You know, but didn't think anything of it, cuz again, I'm not an idiot. I'm not gonna go after something that I have no chance on, but she made the comment and I was like,

Curt:

well, sometimes you're an idiot because you don't realize that you have a chance. Yeah. Yeah. So, so how long does it take him to catch. um,

Patrick:

I don't know if it was a catch on, she, she she's very open with comp, just became

Curt:

friends and whatever. I, uh, I have a, a theory that generally speaking in, especially in good relationships, the, the woman is the decider. Like it's her choice. Like Jill told her mom after like our third date, like, he's the man I'm gonna marry really. And that's cool. I learned much later about this. Right. But like, to a certain extent, even though he didn't know it yet. And may, you didn't know it yet either, but to some extent you were the decider,

Patrick:

I think. Yeah, for sure. And it was, you know, probably through our freshman year that we just were, we were kind of passively friends. No, we were pretty good friends. We'd go parties together with a group of us. There was like four or five of us. And then it probably wasn't really, until I had my, I had a career ending injury my freshman year that then we started to spend more time together and. Um, it was a party and I made a, I probably had a little bit, you know, too much to drink and made a move and she reciprocated. And you were like, holy shit. Yeah. Kiss of today. Yeah, pretty much. And then from there it still wasn't, you know, anytime soon, but like we started to hanging out a little bit more and more, and then. it was actually after the 2008 Olympic trials that she came back kind of defeated a little bit, pretty upset that it was, we had been hanging out quite a bit, but then at that point we became official, you know, as far as boyfriend and

Curt:

girlfriends. And so I want to talk about that because the 2012 Olympics is when you meted, right? Mm-hmm And so you graduated college then probably about 2008, nine, and then went back for your masters. Was that in part, just a involved with the track community and, and stuff like that, or,

Janey:

um, I just knew that if I was gonna do anything big with track and field, that you could lose it in a heartbeat, I needed to get my master's for sure. At least have a backup plan. So fair

Curt:

enough. Cause I've been listening, learning a little bit about the life of an Olympic athlete and like it's pretty rough. Like you're hiring coaches and stuff with no money and no sponsorships and no chance of getting any of the gravy that the Olympics generates for. It's. People that work at the Olympics and stuff like that. It's pretty gross. It is. Um, would you be interested in talking about that topic while we're here? Yeah, absolutely. Um, like talk to me about the life of a, of a athlete. You were a student athlete still and some are, and some aren't or are most all Olympic athletes, still students, at least in this in area. Not all of

Janey:

them. Um, some still are, they're still in college, but you have to kind of make that leap to, you know, let go of your school in order to be, you know, considered for money and all that stuff. Fair enough. So, okay. Um, it was, it's kind of rough getting into track and field for sure. Um, it's not like, you know, the men's basketball and football and all that stuff where you, you make, you know, guru money and you can just go hire whoever you need to, to kind of support your career, but dragon fields, you know, nothing like that. And so for me, it was, it was tough getting in. I, I think I went to Europe for a year with an agent that I just kind of. Fell into his lap. Um, oh, interesting. I was in Germany, stationed in Germany, and I had meet after meet, after meet, after meet and I made money, but it wasn't enough to, to barely cover the cost of being there. Right. So, um, I was considered professional

Curt:

at the time. Right. You know, I wasn't making, I make 5,000 a month and I spend 5,500

Janey:

a month. Yeah. Yeah. So it was kind of, I didn't, I didn't have anything to my name in that sense, but it was, if anything, it was about the experience. Yeah. I learned, you know, what, it was like to be in Europe to compete against people and in other countries and all of that. And, um, I got some, some really good, you know, information just for myself on what I needed to do to be better. Yeah. And, um, it just so happened too, that I, I lost some weight during that time and ended up my last meet over in Europe. It being. the furthest I ever jumped and I had PRD and okay. And even with an injury at the time, I, I realized that, you know, maybe I could be as good as these, you know, other girls and maybe get to these bigger meets and stuff. And yeah. Um, and so that was kind of like the real start of my career was realizing, Hey, maybe I could do this.

Curt:

That belief in yourself is a powering agent. Isn't it? Yeah, absolutely. Um, so when, how does it catch traction from there? Like, is it just kind of more of the same, more meats, more. Qualifiers more, all the things. Yeah. And is it a year long and it's not right? Or is it like, are you training all year or is there more of a season?

Janey:

Yeah. Yeah. So there's the off season and there's the on season, the off season is where you're putting in all the work, you know, all the stuff that you don't wanna be doing in order to, you know, get into tip top peak shape for competition. Yeah. And so during the fall, that's where you're doing all the running and then spring is spring. Summer is kind of when your, um, your meets and

Curt:

stuff are. And were you just focused on long jump by this time? Or were you multidisciplined?

Janey:

I was multidisciplined at the time I had just picked up hurdles and so I was hing over in Europe as well as long jumping. Yeah.

Curt:

So talk to me about like the training regimen, like what kinds of exercises, like obviously a lot of running and just launching and stuff like that. Right. But like what makes the right muscles stronger squats and things like that, or, yeah.

Janey:

So, I mean, strength was, it was all about strength and having the strength to run fast. And so performance was built upon, you know, explosive

Curt:

strength, kind of not endurance

Janey:

strength mm-hmm And so, uh, being in the weight room was super important. It was squats, it was cleans, it was, um, you know, fast Twitch type stuff. So you're doing a lot of speed stuff. Yeah. And then, you know, out there on the track, it's, you know, one 50 S two hundreds. Yeah. Um, you know, repetitions over the hurdles and then obviously long jump, you know, pit work where you're jumping into the pit off boxes, you know, figuring out what you do in the air, you know,

Curt:

sprinting down the runway. Yeah. That body control in the air is crucial. I have to think the take off thing, the timing, like, yes, don't jump six inches too soon. Cuz that means you land six inches earlier dummy. It's hard when you run at full speed, I

Janey:

reckon. Yeah. So it's all about, you know, getting the consistency muscle memory. Mm-hmm, getting the consistency down. And so, um, it was just, you know, repetitions in.

Curt:

So I have a, a younger brother he's 10 years younger than me, and we're genetically very similar he's in North Dakota. So he weighs 40 pounds more than I do, but, but he can kick my ass in a sprint, but I, he can't even run a mile. uh, like we're otherwise very much the same, but I got the long twitches and he got the fast twitches. Are you like, can you run two miles or five miles if you want to? Nope. Nope, no, it's weird. Right? Like the fast people are just, just rarely long.

Janey:

Yeah. I always wonder how people do it. Cuz I feel like it hurts. I'm like, oh gosh, how can you run that long?

Patrick:

So she's a very gifted athlete, like just naturally, but she's also a very, like, she's very, you know, quietly spoken and, but then when it gets down to competition, she is a competitor. Yeah. Like she. she goes hard.

Curt:

I'm pretty sure you could still outrun me in a one mile race. I don't know about that. I wouldn't want to, so Patrick, tell me about what you were up to in this time, right? Cause Jenay, had you guys started officially dating before you went on this kind of, uh, season of, of Europe and things like that, or, yeah, I'll

Patrick:

be, I mean, I'll be real. Um, you know, I was in school going through it. Um, I was not competing at this time cause like I said, had a career injury. Yep. But you know, um, I was, I think, you know, obviously not obviously, but Jana would say, uh, probably I was skeptical and like she, there was some resentment there and, you know, cause there was, uh, you know, I made a comment at some point that really hit a nerve for her. Like you don't believe in me, like, and it was almost kinda like I'm gonna show you type deal. Mm. And it was like, it wa it was. I think at that time she would had just gotten done with Germany. There was probably a relationship with a, a track athlete, especially at the beginning of the career was very difficult. This was pre FaceTime. And so we were doing Skype calls and she was eight to 10 hours ahead of time from me. So like, if I wanted to talk with her, I was pretty much waking up super early to get her before her meet or coming home middle of the afternoon to talk with her. And, you know, so I think there might have been some, like, I wanted her to succeed, but she was like grinding, grinding. Like she was right in a hotel with like two or three roommates or, you know, I mean just, yeah, scraping

Curt:

the bottom of the well, and you're like, you're giving up me and our relationship for this thing that maybe won't even work. Plus you're a little bit jealous and a little bit angry because you had this injury again after you were starting to show promise.

Patrick:

Yeah. Maybe some, some of that. And so there was like some probably like uncertainty and like. All right, what's gonna happen. And I think, you know, um, there was a Jana did everything on her own, but I think there was some, you know, resentment there and I'm gonna show him type deal. And then it was, um, an indoor USA championships that she jumped 6 99 and her previous best was, uh,

Curt:

that's like 699 centimeters or something. Yep. Which is

Patrick:

six yeah. 6.99. Exactly. And her previous best was probably like 6 60, 6 70, something like that. So she jumped significantly higher and, and overnight got on every agent's radar and was getting calls left after right. Type deal. And it was like, for me, I had this aha like, holy cow, like my girlfriend is really

Curt:

good. Like, you know, she right. She's go to the Olympics Navy. She's probably, she's taught

Patrick:

10 in the world right now. Right. And, um, so I. Going through school. And at this time, you know, when she did that, you know, you, I become a believer. She had always had the belief in herself. I would love to be, you know, lovey dev and be like, oh, I always believed in her and always was there for her. But she, you know, she had a power through

Curt:

sometimes thought

Patrick:

that too. Yeah. And so it which speaks to her character and, you know, commitment to herself. And so she had that. She then, um, got in touch with a, a, you know, a good agent that, you know, represented a lot of the top athletes. And at this point, her grind somewhat stopped. She got a salary, she got some sponsorships or a sponsor, I should say she got into all the, the big meats. So she started to actually make some money. And for us, you know, I was still in school. Um, I, what was your degree? Accounting. Okay. I was still in school. Um, she was starting to make decent money, you know, for track, you know? Yeah. Which is something to be said. And we bought our first house. Right after I graduated. Oh, you weren't married yet? We weren't married. Okay. Uh, this was 2000 early, 2012 that we bought our first house. Okay. Or maybe it was late 2011. One of those, um, we bought our first house and it was kind of a fixerupper. It was one of the last foreclosures before. Right. They went away. Right. And we bought it in the Loveland. And, uh, you know, that was kind of, again, I had a little bit of a background in my freshman and sophomore year with like fix and flips. Sure. And so I had some opportunities to source some contractors and she was, she's always been a ride or die. Like, well, whatever I trust you, like she, like, it was always a, I like there was never any doubt or anything like that. And I think that was cuz of maybe some of the difference that we were raised. Like my dad was very like business driven. He always raised me with talking about business and money and things of that nature. Whereas Jana's family really never talked about money and things of that nature, uh, mortgages, credit cards, paying bills, anything like that. It just was like, you don't worry about that. We'll take care of it. Whereas my dad was like, here's, you know, a mortgage here's how much, you know, you need to make, here's what you need to do to pay through your school and yeah. And different things. So talk to me

Curt:

about your dad's business too. Cause it sounds like your interaction with that probably really fueled your flames of fire to be an entrepreneur on your

Patrick:

own. Yeah, he was, uh, he ran his own company for like 25 years. Um, and I worked for him since I was 13, you know, until I was and what kind of business it was a, you know, it was an import export business. That really sounds bad when I say it like that, but essentially drug smuggler. Exactly. You know, he had a, he had a, a stable of like 250 drug dealers, uh, you know, basically sales agents, rug dealers. Yeah. Right. No, just kidding, uh, sales agents across the us. And he would sell impulse items. So like, uh, cigarette lighters, sunglasses, bandanas. Oh, interesting. And it was a really interesting business and. Uh, the, actually the, the economy, when it dropped in 2007, eight, he closed down right. As I was getting into school, which the idea was I was gonna take that company over. That was kind of the entire plan. And that's how I, it got

Curt:

pretty rocked by recession

Patrick:

stuff and people paying at the pump and different, different, you know, side as much different, different aspects. But yeah, always was raised in that type of mentality of I'm gonna run my own business.

Curt:

So Olympic trials are coming up. I imagine pretty quick here. According to the storyline. Uh mm-hmm talk to me about that.

Janey:

Um, I'm in school at the time, um, for my master's in occupational therapy and, you know, traveling and trying to, you know, keep my grades and still, you know, give everything I got thinking about, you know, what it takes it for me as an athlete. Were you a good

Curt:

student naturally? Yes, I was. And, and you as well, Patrick? Yeah. Pretty good. Yeah, not quite as good as Janay, but close mm-hmm

Janey:

he didn't try hard. He was just naturally

Curt:

good at it'd rather try a little harder than that's what my teachers would say. Like Kurt would be one of the best students I've ever had if he tried at all. been there. Yeah. So, so you're studying, keeping your grades up, uh, trials are approaching.

Janey:

Yeah, well, actually it was indoor that year, so it was an indoor world championship that year. Okay. In, um, Istanbul, Istanbul. Oh, wow. Turkey. And so I, that was the. The first time I actually metaled was there in the long jump. So I got second place and wow. Made a silver medal there. Um, and that was kind of just more, is it real silver?

Patrick:

I, I don't know. No idea. I

Curt:

don't think so. Yeah. I doubt it. The Olympic people are like, well, it's just, uh, we'll just spray paint it. Cause otherwise we had to pay ourselves

Patrick:

less. Yeah, exactly. It looks good. Good.

Janey:

I'm sure it does. Um, but yeah, I got a silver medal, uh, at the world indoor championships and that was just kind of more, that's like an automatic

Curt:

Olympic qualifier then. Is

Janey:

that not quite okay. You still had to go to the trials. You still had to place top three at the Olympic trials in order to go. And it just so happened that, you know, we had athletes coming out of nowhere jumping really far that year. So it was kind of like I went into the trials, like freaking out touch and go. I was like, oh my gosh, this is gonna be really tough. And, um, it, that year it took. The furthest it had ever taken any three athletes to jump he had. Oh, really? Yeah. And so all of us went over 23 feet. Wow. For the first time in history. So we made history just by jumping as far as we did. Interesting. Fourth place person, um, jumped, I think 6 97, which is 22. I don't nine or 10 or something. Would've won any previous trials. Mm-hmm

Curt:

Wow. Yeah. Interesting. So what changed, was it just, you know, just kind of the natural evolution of athletes bigger, faster, stronger, or was there some new techniques to the sport or things that were getting people more air

Janey:

Olympic year? Everyone just

Curt:

decides on the, crank it up a

Janey:

notch. Yeah. That they're gonna, they know that in the us that if you're an us athlete and you make top three, you're probably gonna medal. Like that's how good the us is. And so I think people know that and they know like if I can make this team, I could possibly be an Olympic gold or silver or bronze

Curt:

medalist. Right, right, right. It's an interesting, uh, backdrop. It's such a culture of excellence for so long. Right. Mm-hmm And so where were the Olympics in 2012. They were in London. Okay. So you and, and the trials were here stateside somewhere. I imagine mm-hmm, in Eugene, Oregon. Okay. Um, and so obviously you crank it up a notch, just like everybody else and you make the top three

Janey:

mm-hmm yep. We, I made top three. Patrick was there, his family and my family, um, probably it next to being on the, the stage at the Olympics. That was probably my next best accomplishments was having made the team. That was hard. I mean, um, personally that, that was just a, a big barrier to get over, like knowing that you could make the team. Yeah. And it, it's hard. It's hard to do

Curt:

now. Patrick's credited your like personal strength a lot, even when maybe he was a doubter a little bit maybe and whatever. Did you like, do you have any techniques or did you have counselors or coaches or people that you want to give props to? Are you just like internally fired. I'm gonna get it. If

Janey:

anything, it'd be my dad. Yeah. Um, he was just always the kind of guy that was humble himself. Yeah. Um, they, his, his, his name is William Deloche. They used to call him WD 40, because he was like the leader and he would bring everybody together, smooth things out and

Curt:

take the friction out of the situation

Janey:

Uhhuh. And so he, he was always just kind of quiet, but had power. I was able to do always able to perform when he needed to. Yeah. And so I kind of got that from him and his humility as well. Like he accomplished so many things and I realized you don't have to be boastful. You don't have to

Curt:

be, were you close with him during this time too? Talking on the phone a lot and stuff like that. Absolutely. Mm-hmm That's cool. Yeah. And so, um, so Patrick, I guess you guys are off to, oh, assuming you went to the Olympics too. Mm-hmm yeah. I went to the Olympics since I was 12. Yeah. And when did you guys get married? after the Olympics, after the

Patrick:

Olympics. Okay. Mm-hmm it's funny. You know, my family to this day will kind of gimme some shit because, you know, as we might talk about, you know, we got divorced AF only a year and a half after we got married. Oh, was it that fast?

Curt:

Uhhuh and probably Janay when I met you first was your first marriage. Yep. I suspect.

Patrick:

Yeah. And, uh, so there was a Deloche that went to the 2012 Olympics and then a Deloche that went to the 2016 Olympics. So my par family always gives me shit that a soup still hasn't made the, the Olympics and it's my fault.

Curt:

I love it. Oh, so you guys were apart for a little while, then two years. Yeah. Yeah. So, um, so talk to me about, I guess, the Olympic experience while we're, while we're here in the timeline.

Janey:

Oh, uh, amazing. So you, the opening ceremonies, I mean, that speaks for itself. You said this

Curt:

was UK mm-hmm yeah.

Janey:

In London. Yeah. Yeah. Uhhuh um, speaks for itself, just. The presence walking. I mean, it was a lot of walking is electric in the most uncomfortable shoes, but we were there in the stadium, you know, when they were announcing all the countries and seeing all the other people and to know that these other athletes are just as good as I am. If not better. Yeah. Like that, it was, it was awesome. It was all inspiring. And to know that the person sitting next to me was a gold medalist and this one's a silver medalist and everybody's a medalist. And, you know, so it was, it was amazing. And then to have my family, Patrick and my mom, my dad, everybody get to go and be a part of that. That was pretty awesome too. It's

Curt:

gotta be so intense to like, have your body as finally tuned and capable as, and, but everybody else around you is almost equally tuned and capable. And so it's gonna come down to performance. Yep. Like in the end, it's not just like, who's the biggest, fastest stronger, but there's still a game to be played in your, in your head and in your body.

Janey:

Yep. It was all about consistency. I mean, if you could stay consistent and jump what you, you know, an average. But when you would normally jump, you could probably get on the stage. You just didn't wanna have that down day. You wanted to have the day where it was at least average. And that was exactly what I had was kind of an average day. It wasn't my best day. Oh,

Curt:

is that right? Mm-hmm you went to bronze medal with an average day. I did actually.

Patrick:

Mm-hmm she had a gold medal jump. She had a gold medal jump, but ed buy to

Janey:

nail. Oh yeah. And I was actually disappointed with my metal really? The first two days. MOPD internally. I was moping like I was for everyone else. I was smiling, but I was not happy. Yeah. I was not happy about having, cuz I didn't go there to get a bronze medal. I went there to get a gold medal and I knew I could get a gold medal and I just needed that jump and I just barely missed it. Yeah. And I don't, I don't think I even appreciated my medal until I watched, um, a girl in the high jump who had been dominating all year, who was expected to win. She was a us athlete as well. She was expected to win and she went down on her final attempt and the high jump and knocked the bar down and got fourth place. And I saw her crumble to the mat in tears. Yeah. And that, and at that

Curt:

moment, bronzes medal feels pretty good. I got bronze medal. This

Janey:

is is harder than I thought it would. You know? So I, you know, perspective.

Curt:

Yeah. Yeah. That's fair. That's fair. So there was other PanAm games and things like that along the way. Did you, did you ever get a gold medal? I didn't

Janey:

no. No. I did the PanAm. She got some USA

Patrick:

championships. Okay.

Curt:

But it's not going that all. No, no, but it's first place still.

Janey:

Yeah. So yeah. Won a few USA championships. Um, it was always between me and one of the best in the world, which was Britney Reese. And, oh, I remember that name too. Um, she, she was amazing and competing against her was

Patrick:

damn Britney.

Curt:

No, I'm I think for

Janey:

a while I had the best record against her. Um, I beat her more than any other athlete had really.

Curt:

So yeah, it was, that's

Patrick:

pretty cool. She'd go down as the best, all time. Woman's long jumper, probably. Maybe for now, she doesn't have the world record, but she's, as far as medals and things of that nature, she's

Curt:

like she's been up there forever kind of thing. Yeah. Mm-hmm so, um, you guys get married mm-hmm and. Like obviously track is still a big part of Jana's life. What's your, you were working, uh, property management kind at that point probably soon or? Yeah.

Patrick:

So when my dad shut down his business, I I'm a big believer in mentors. And so I called, uh, my uncle who was successful. Didn't even have a clue what he did and just asked him, Hey, would you mentor me? And he said, well, I'm not always here, but if you want to come work for me, you can be a leasing agent. And when I'm in town, I'll talk with you. And so I started working for him as a better than other I got. So I started working for him as a leasing agent. Um, and then pretty much continued on with that after graduation. And, you know, there was a little tweener job in between, but then ultimately came back with. And so I was working property management as a pretty entry, I mean, you know, college degree with accounting making 18 bucks an hour. Yeah. You know, as a, and, uh,

Curt:

you didn't think about being an accountant or was it just not a great job market at the

Patrick:

time? Or? I always knew from day one, I was gonna get a degree in accounting, but not be an accountant. I, I liked, um, I love numbers. I love spreadsheets. I love seeing where numbers come and go. But, um, for me it was having the base knowledge so that I could run a company, um, you know, and have the financial savvy to know if I'm getting had, or, you know, what needs to happen for the company to be in, you know, in the black yeah. Understanding margins and yeah, exactly. So never was gonna be a bean counter. And, uh, yeah, with

Curt:

the apologies to all you bean encounters out there that love

Patrick:

it. Absolutely. There's, there's, uh, it is a personality type and if you have it, you can do really well. Um, love numbers, but yes, I was working in property management and full time and we bought our first house. We actually then kind of flipped it, sold it. We bought our second house and then with Jene, really, because of her financial standing at that point, she was doing so well financially, which, you know, wasn't like amazing. And we're not talking millions by any means. Right. But we became minority partners, uh, with my dad and some investment properties. So we started our own investment portfolio. Okay. Where myself, my dad and Janee are all business partners, like supergroup

Curt:

investments was born kind of. Yeah. You know, I dunno, if's called

Patrick:

that, but whatever exactly. Yeah. So, um, yeah, so we started investing together and, uh, so we had bought, at that point, we had, we were married and bought a house in 2013 and it wasn't long after that, you know, got a divorce and. Um, but we maintained our partnerships and even maintained that house. Cuz it was interest. It was a good financial investment. Yeah. You

Curt:

could manage her assets for her while she's off winning championships and things like that. I mean,

Patrick:

obviously we got back together, so it was a pretty like we weren't. Yeah. We weren't

Curt:

glad didn't spend that time and effort unwinding it. Yeah. Um, are you willing to share. Own who owns what? In regards to that divorce? I think

Patrick:

it was a mutual, you know, I was, we were young, we were young didn't we just didn't get it. We

Janey:

didn't realize that we should probably try a little harder, do a little more she's

Patrick:

a black woman for Collins. And she always had the idea of, I want, and she grew up in a military base. So, which is pretty diverse. And she did not like the idea of raising half black kids in a predominantly white community where there's not much diversity. And I was, that's what she was trying to drag

Curt:

you out of Fort Collins,

Patrick:

kind of, there was some of that and I was very stubborn, not even like, even for one second considering, but again, to Jana's point, you could move if you want to. Yeah. To Jana's point, you know, we were. Pretty young and stubborn. And there was a lot of growing up that had to be done because I was a young man when I, when we got pretty serious. Sure. When I was 18

Curt:

years old. Yeah. I never even had a real girlfriend vet until like 22 or something.

Patrick:

Yeah. So there was some, some selfishness, but I would say mutually separated, stayed business partners. Yeah. Um, stayed in contact over those two years that we were part, we got divorced in what, 2014. 14. So we stayed together. We in communication over those two years and kind of restarted the engine in 16 in 2016. Yeah. So talk to me

Curt:

about that. Like, what was the, was there a spark or it was just time or, um, like what was it that, that catalyzed that reconnection

Janey:

at the end of the day? I, we never, I don't think we ever stopped loving each other. I think we just. Couldn't get over ourselves. Yeah. I mean, we were just in our own way, most of the time. And so I think once we kind of had some time away from each other and we, I think for me, it was, I saw him one time in the car. I'd never seen him, you know, we lived this close together. I had not seen him. And I looked at him, I still love him. And so I think, you know, I still want him and turd and we still had to talk and be in communication with each other. And so it was kind of one of those things where it was like, it wasn't over, over. And I mean, we did get a divorce, but I still knew I had feelings

Curt:

for him. Was there like an awkward first move moment in that rekindling? Or was it just kind of a slowly growing back together? He would

Janey:

ask me, Hey, let's go to dinner and talk about business and I'd be like, okay. Yeah, we need to talk about business. And so it was kind of,

Curt:

it's nice to be pursued, right? Like that's, uh, I think for both men and women, but especially women, they, they want be pursued a little bit. Um, yeah.

Patrick:

And you know, for me too, like I think one of the things that Jenay wanted to see is one of the things I think she would mention is that she didn't feel like she could talk to me because I had like a, you know, a temper and this anger problem when I was, you know, I'm redheaded, Irish. Right. You know, so I've got, I don't know whether it's genetics that or what, but,

Curt:

um, not an excuse, but maybe

Patrick:

a reason. Yeah. And, but I, so when we got divorced, I kind of had that. I was young, not cocky by any means, but I had this really big, humbling experience of being young and divorced and my world's turned upside down and, you know, maybe it's me. Yeah. And so I, you know, started a go, go to counseling and kind of work on me and, uh, you know, talk about, you know, my life, my issues, and kind of was open to the idea of not being such a jerk maybe. Yeah. And maybe yelling. And screaming's not,

Curt:

my life is sure easier when you let go of that big ball of anger that some people drag around and we don't even always know that we're dragging it around.

Patrick:

Yeah. Right. And I think she maybe saw some of that, that there, there was, maybe it was easier to con you know, to communicate yeah. When there was difficult conversations. My first reaction was in anger. Yeah. And so I think maybe over time, cause I know we were apart for two years. Yeah. There was like, Hmm. Maybe it's not a show. Maybe it's not. Yeah. You know, whatever. Maybe we can actually work on this. So we that's awesome. We agreed to, you know, once we started to kind of see each other again, we agreed that we're gonna go to see counseling together. So we started to see a counselor once a month or something like that for like the first year. Maybe once every like two weeks it was, it was

Curt:

relatively often. Yeah. Yeah. My wife and I went to a pretty good stretch of counseling as well, back in the day, uh, uh, early in my entrepreneurial journey, cuz I was just so wrapped up in my own self. I didn't have any time or space for her and her feelings and whatever. Yeah. Um, do you have a big ceremony when you get remarried?

Patrick:

$35, $32 30 cents. Yeah.

Janey:

He called me one day and he said, Hey, you wanna go get married? And I was like, like now he's like, yeah. I'm like, okay. So I went

Curt:

to the courthouse. yeah. I've renew my auto insurance is, and I could save $200. Yeah. With guy. Exactly. yeah. So, well, that's awesome. I like that, uh, that just you're sharing. Thanks, Patrick, for, for being humble. And, you know, I appreciate that, uh, that each side, you know, that it takes two sides to have struggles usually. Yeah. Jana, what would you say that, like, there was probably things that you did that drove him crazy during that time otherwise. Oh yeah. I mean, what, what was your, were you just too focused on your athletics or what? No, I think if you were gonna own, so.

Janey:

Um, definitely grew up in a matriarchal family, whereas his is patriarchal. So he thought he ran and I'm like, no, I run this show And so I

Patrick:

was

Curt:

stubborn, you know? Interesting. I didn't, despite the fact that your dad was humble and loved and so servant hearted mm-hmm he's still kind of, your mom ran the household. My mom

Janey:

ran the household. Yeah. And so that was kind of how I thought it should be. Yeah. And you know, when he wanted to put his foot down, well, I'm gonna put my

Curt:

foot down. Right. I'll put my foot down on you. Yeah.

Janey:

So yeah, we, we definitely butted heads because I had a certain expectation may, may not have always been explicit on how things should be and he did as well. And sometimes I didn't wanna budge. So

Curt:

do you guys have, like, are you just agree to disagree in that general prospect now? Would you say no,

Patrick:

there's no sweeping on the road with, with this woman it will be

Curt:

discussed. No, but I mean, in that regard to matriarchal patriarchal, like as far as how you raise your children and like even the relationship I would say's. Pretty 50 50. Yeah, we agree that. Okay. We're just equal then. Yeah. Yeah.

Patrick:

That's fair for sure. I think we both have mutual respect of, you know, and I think we'll, you know, to a certain extent, there's times that we'll obviously get mad and frustrated and upset with each other, but like, I think we do a pretty good job of, Hey, you know, don't please don't do this. Cause it cuts me down. And this is how, you know, I believe, you know, we should do this and you know, we have a discussion about it and we don't like come to like a, this is how we are going to raise our, it is more just like, please understand where I'm coming from. And I understand let's move forward with it. Yeah. A lot more

Curt:

flexible with how we do things. My, uh, my blog this month is going to be, uh, are you speaking my language? Yeah. And it's all about kind of clear understanding and clear agreement and, and things like that. So that's great. Um, Jene, I wanna kind of fast forward through the rest of your Olympic career and like a little bit of a, what comes next, cuz you go to the Olympics again in 16 mm-hmm that was in Rio de Janeiro, Rio mm-hmm and uh, Tell me about like you didn't metal. Was there, was it close? Was it competitive? Were you hurt? Were you in a bad head space? Just getting too old. Yeah. Well,

Janey:

um, injuries at the end of the day. Uh, yeah, I had in 2014 actually broken my ankle and didn't I remember that, no, I broke it. It was, they said it was a bad sprain. And so I competed for a whole year without really knowing I had any injuries. And so I had to come back to the Olympics and, and thought I lost my career. I thought I was done, you know? Yeah. Thought I would not be able to come back from this, which is why I was still working as an occupational therapist PRN. Yeah. And so, um, I decided I wanted to come back and try off my right foot. So I've actually made the 2016 Olympics off of the opposite. That's right. And I wanted to, um, I wanted to have, you know, that time I was able to get my career back so to speak. Yeah. And, and are

Curt:

you kind of naturally arou or was that just hard? No, that was the hardest

Janey:

thing I've ever had to do. That was the hardest thing. I always tell people, if you don't have to do it, don't do it heal up and, and use your same, like don't

Curt:

switch if you don't have, yeah. We have a rule here at the local think tank, ping pong table. If you're up by five or more, you have to play with your offhand. Oh gosh. It's a nice little handicap and it's fun. It's but it's you feel like, like Lefty's a redheaded stepchild? No offense. yeah. So, um, I can only imagine the mental. Oh, like focus, it would have to take to like, not off the right leg or not off the, I forget, which was which, but to totally switch your, run up your launch, all that mm-hmm I always

Janey:

tell people it's like, you have to have, if you're right handed and you have great penmanship, you now have to be lefthanded him. The exact thing. Great thing. Oh, I got, and, and that was really tough. The, probably the toughest thing I've ever had to do. Yeah. But I did it. Yes. And in 2016, I still struggled with the same leg injury. Um, even though I was jumping off the left foot.

Curt:

Right. But we just gotta run.

Janey:

Yeah. But I still able to compete. I was still able to make the team. I mean, I went to Olympics twice. I mean, get the smaller and smaller with each Olympic year that you make. So yeah. Um, to have done that, it was just such a good accomplishment to have overcome that again, that I was kind of like, yeah, I feel good about myself.

Curt:

You said you're occupational therapist. Is that right? Mm-hmm so you're fixing, people's broken things all the time. And frankly, having gone through. that struggle has to make you so much more empathetic and capable in your

Janey:

career. Yeah. And I always share a story with my patients too, you know? Sure. I'm like, well now you have to do what I did at one point. Right.

Curt:

just be glad you don't have to jump off your wrong foot. Yeah. Mm-hmm yeah. So we're probably getting about to the time of the initial birthing of soup real estate. Yeah.

Patrick:

Yeah. I actually great timeline actually, Kurt, uh, we, uh, it was 2016 and, um, My mentor, you know, I, I mentored under my, my uncle, but really the mentor during that time, when I was working at old town square properties was ed stoner. You sure you're a former mayor, very successful investor, great guy. He was there every day, all day. Right. He took me under his wing. He made some loans for me on personal investments. Interesting. He made, he came to Brian and, and gave him his, you know, resignation, you know, he and Brian gave Brian asked for, I think a 12 month notice at that time. And so ed had given that, and at that point I was an onsite property manager for, uh, apartment complex in Fort Collins. And, you know, there's that, that has a lifeline. I mean, anybody's doing that, you know, I, I, I, I empathize with them immediately. Like, wow, good for you. That is, that takes a certain type of person. And so at that time I put, and I was young. I don't know how young, I, I mean, I guess I was six years ago, so I was 27, um, youngish, I guess. Yeah. I put my, my hat in the ring for, to take ed spot, to take over, uh, the company to run the company. Yeah. And which

Curt:

was, you know, property management, there was what, 40,000 square feet, or more than that with lots of different tenants and

Patrick:

buildings and yeah, exactly. There was a commercial arm, um, a significant re residential arm. Right. So ton

Curt:

of commercial and residential. Yeah.

Patrick:

Yeah. And there was, uh, 12 full-time employees. Wow. And so I, I put my name in the ring, you know, I'm never lack for confidence type deal or, you know, at least try, obviously, you know, never lack, you know? And so I put my name in the ring and it was. You know, very, it was with great respect, but no, you are too young. Um, appreciate you go, you know, go forward young Padawan. And, uh, so I, at that point, you know, registered my LLC as a property management company, cause I was gonna run a property management company. Okay. Um, and went off to Brazil. They had hired somebody out of Minnesota. Who ran the, um, what is that mall mall of America. Oh yeah. And so that was the new hire and it just quickly was revealed that it wasn't a great fit. And, um, I'm in R yeah, a

lot

Curt:

of difference between running a mall set of tenants and stuff compared to a complex bunch of different kinds of properties and people.

Patrick:

Yeah. And, and, uh, I got the call in, in Rio Janero or text, and Brian just asked if you have a minute, please call me. And so he said, Hey, we want you to, I'm gonna, I want you to run the company, you know? Wow, it's yours. If you want it, this just didn't work out. I'd rather go with somebody I trust. And it's you. So at 27 years old, I took over the company and, uh, ran it for. Well up really until February of this year, but all I told him, I said, I will run this company, but I have started my business. And I want, I, that is a requirement that I am allowed to grow this as I'm working for

Curt:

you. Interesting. I didn't realize you manage that company for that long.

Patrick:

Yeah. And so I, uh, so I, he said, yep, whatever you want, you got it. So, um, so I ran old town square properties for, you know, uh, six years. Yeah. And,

Curt:

um, and did they turn over to another, my cousin side

Patrick:

manager. Okay. My cousin, which I'm really grateful for cuz you know, he had a, he had a rougher, um, you know, go between his twenties and thirties.

Curt:

Oh, is that

Patrick:

Troy? Y yep. Yeah. And, uh, I've golf with Troy a few times. Yeah. But you know, he kind of, he showed that he's dedicated, he wants to run the company it's, you know, ultimately gonna be his at some point. Yeah. And so why not? And so they turned it over to him and. Um, but yeah, during 2016, it was when the launch of SUA real estate was ska property management at that time, which then turned into a DBA of SGA real estate in 2018. When I changed my focus from property management to brokerage. I

Curt:

remember that. Yeah. So, um, how was Patrick becoming an entrepreneur Ben for you, Jeanette, you were always an investor. It sounds like, and came to believe was that because you believed in Patrick because you weren't really the money girl and stuff like that.

Janey:

Well, when I met him, he was, you know, everything was business, business business. So I don't know any other Patrick that's who he is. Right. You know, that's, that's what he is. And he's, he's passionate about it. That's what he loves to do. And so that's what he wants to do. I'll support him in anything that he does. Yeah.

Curt:

Fair enough. Um, and so you quickly pivoted, or you still, you manage your own properties, you got a handful of investments, some with your uncle and things mm-hmm Um, but then pivoted to be, would you describe, describe your firm? Let's just jump right into what's your firm like today, and then we'll kind of breeze through the building of a

Patrick:

team. Sure. Yeah. Today it's, uh, two assistants and two full-time agents and then myself. So it's team of five. Okay. Um, never in a million years would've thought like I would be a traditional residential focused brokerage. Um, well, I

Curt:

don't think you're very traditional. Yeah. You've done all kinds of like Instagram videos and YouTube things and stuff. Yeah.

Patrick:

And, and it was one of those things where. Maybe I didn't have, um, the utmost respect cuz I came from the background of like investment real estate. So like very, very numbers driven, very analytical. Yeah. And when you walk through a property with, um, some there's some great realtors, like, so when you, but when you walk through with some, you know, their focus is, oh my goodness. You know, isn't that a beautiful back splash? No, I don't give a, you know, about, you know, a black. Yeah, that'd be great. Um, I don't give a, you know, rats ass about a back splash, but I care about what the numbers look like on the investment side. And is this a good area and is it appreciating and, and how does that look moving forward? And so in two thou I, I got my license. I actually got my real estate license when I was, um, working for my uncle as a leasing agent. I did a self-study through a summer when I was still in school Uhhuh, but I became active in 2013, hung my license, um, was buy well, the purpose was to be able to buy and sell real estate for myself. Um, and save on the commissions, but then, you know, through being in it and having experience, you just kind of start to organically, get people reaching out to you and just asking, Hey, you know, I'm, I'm wanting to buy a house. Yeah. And, uh, actually one of my, um, agents right now, he was one of my first clients and he wanted to buy a house. So he came through me and I helped him buy a house. I helped my sister buy a house, helped, you know, a few other friends at that point, you know? Um, and then all of a sudden you start to do some, some deals and you're like, man, like, this is, I'm actually pretty fun. Yeah. I'm actually, I'm actually kind of enjoying

Curt:

this. Yeah. From where you thought you were gonna go, you thought if anything, if you were a realtor that you would've been focused on investment properties exactly. For their investors.

Patrick:

Yeah. And so, you know, when we continue to pick up one or two, well, two to three rental units a year, um, as far as investments go. And so I saw brokerage as an opportunity to, you know, provide the down payment for. Buying investment properties. Yeah. And so my goal was between 2013 and 2018 really was to do two to three real estate transactions a year, which would generate me anywhere between, you know, 25 to $30,000. Right. I was partnered with my dad. And at that time, Fort Collins's real estate was not nearly as expensive as it is now. Right. So you could, so you could find a good solid duplex for $400,000, which 20, 25% down is about 40 grand. Right. So I could go in there and be a 50% owner with my dad and, and have the capital to be able to do that. Yeah.

Curt:

Well, in some of those early real estate investments, you know, they're probably some real strong equity in some of those, and you guys have some positive. How what's your, if I can, I know what's your rental portfolio. Sure we have

Patrick:

20 doors, uh, 19,

Curt:

19. I'm a pretty good guesser, huh? Yeah. Banker

Patrick:

boy. Yeah. Yeah. Seriously. We have, we have 19. Um, and uh, but that total, you know, between partnerships, we have closer to 30, but like with, when you take into consider race and percentage ownership yeah. Your stake, whatever our stake comes around 19 and the brokerage, we have a small, very, very small, uh, property management arm that operates ours. And about four or five friends of ours doors. Yeah.

Curt:

You're not shopping for property management business. No, zero don't

Patrick:

call me zero shopping referrals. Only

Curt:

I Jane you should jump in the business and take care of it. Oh my

Patrick:

gosh. Thank you. Yeah. So we are able to, you know, if we went, if, and when we buy an investment, we just bought one, a couple months ago, we were able to slide it into that property management arm and. And, uh, but now the focus is purely residential, traditional brokerage,

Curt:

and mostly relocations, right? Like, cause you kind of become a, an information provider about what's Fort Collins, like in case I want to move

Patrick:

there. Yeah. You know, COVID, um, I've always, uh, been, you know, I was kind the way that I put it and it's, it'll be interesting how kids grow up today, cuz they'll only know social media. Right. And, uh, technology, whereas Jenae and I grew up as you did, you know, may maybe a little. Be honest. I grew up a long time before you guys, you know, we grew up in this age for me, at least I grew up in my first cell phone that could text was my sophomore year in high school Uhhuh. And so I grew up going outside, getting my knees dirty, you know, playing baseball, that kind of stuff. And then I got, but then I was young enough to have this kind of malleable, uh, carefree brain that I was able to learn technology as it was coming. Yeah. And be on relatively for, you know, the, the front end of it. And, but still maintain the hard work ethic of, from my opinion, growing up, getting your knees dirty, you know, going outside and working, getting your hands dirty, not the idea of the only thing you're gonna do is code or whatever. And right. You know, you wanna be a YouTube star with these kids, influencer

Curt:

influencer. I totes wanna be an influencer.

Patrick:

Yeah. And so I was able to like kind of

Curt:

today, you should leverage your Olympic background to just be super cool online. Let's not

Patrick:

start, I've told her that a million times. I know.

Curt:

No, but don't do, don't do things that, aren't what you wanna do as a life rule for me. Yeah. Then

Patrick:

that would be no yeah. Yeah. So, sorry. Keep going. No, no, you're good. And so, uh, we've always kind of used technology Facebook's, uh, uh, Facebook, Instagram, and then we've, as of COVID, when COVID shut down, you know, we were sitting in our house, I was like, I'm not gonna be, I'm not gonna not do anything here. I don't wanna look back on COVID and think that man, that was a lost two months yeah. Of opportunities. So I started a YouTube channel in 2020 and, um, you know, it was kind of, it was just slow moving each. I was editing each video for the first five, which you know, between each video at that time, when I was editing was probably between like 12 to 20 hours. Right. And I quickly learned for myself that I was like, if I'm gonna continue this, I'm not gonna edit. Which you know, so I offload the editing, which saved me like two to five hours per video. See you,

Curt:

we don't edit at local experience podcast either.

Patrick:

Yeah. And.

Curt:

I don't hire somebody else to edit. I just

Patrick:

don't edit. Yep. And, uh, we, we that's smart. No, I like that. Yeah. Good idea. And so, yeah. Do do social media and that's where a lot of our, our business

Curt:

comes from. Yeah. Well, I've seen some of your videos where you're like describing different neighborhoods in Fort Collins and stuff. And like you work on those things. Like, this is like, this is an unscripted friendly conversation. This is pretty easy compared to like, you map out what you're gonna say and have a little, at least outline script and things like that. I imagine.

Patrick:

Yeah. They, they, they call it long form content on YouTube. And I would say on average, each video, it takes me about seven to 10 hours from sort to finish between. Coming up with content researching it, scripting it, shooting it, uploading it, sending it to the editor, downloading it, uploading it to YouTube, coming up with the keywords and then marketing it. Yeah. So

Curt:

by the way, I should share, I actually, uh, got an application and I reached out from somebody the other day that heard me on the Fort Collins fellows podcast Hmm. Podcast, uh, and was like, cool. What's the local think tank. And what's the local experience podcast that started listening over there. And, uh, that's awesome. So he, he unsubscribed from you and subscribed to mine. Perfect. I'm just kidding. but he did find me because of your podcast. So that's great. Kudos to that. Yeah. Well, I'm glad that happened, Jana. Um, have you been like drawn into the business realm of interest in it and things like that, or it's kind of like Patrick does his thing. I raised the littles and do.

Janey:

Um, I like to know what's going on and kind of be a part in that sense, but most mostly he's kind of, he hasn't

Curt:

sparked an entrepreneurial excitement in you. No,

Janey:

not for

Patrick:

me, but we, we learned that we are not great active business partners. Yeah, yeah.

Curt:

Together. Oh, our best day at the, myself and my wife was when loca got big enough, I could fire her as our bookkeeper cuz yeah. She didn't, you know, and I she's a great organizer and planner and stuff. Mm-hmm um, and that's what I need more. But I don't want her to be my organizer planner, cuz I want her to just love me and accept me. It's

Patrick:

important to learn, you know, sooner than later, some couples rocket

Curt:

as a power couple. Absolutely. You know? Absolutely. And, and we're not that way. And it sounds like you guys don't have that much interest either. She's very

Patrick:

type

Curt:

B. Yeah. Fair enough. Things are certainly, and I'm like, by the way, be fine. I am super honored today, but that you would come and be on my podcast. Cause I know you're a little shy about this kind of stuff. So it is, I know that I am very flattered. I've been, I was more nervous for this one than I have been in a while. Oh,

Patrick:

she gets offered to used to not too much anymore because you know, she's been out of it. But like when she was in the thick of it, monthly come speak to our, you know,

Curt:

company. Yeah. Be on ABC news break,

Patrick:

whatever it was, you know, she was offered and I, I was always the. And so I was always the person who was like, I'll ask, but it's it gonna be a no. Yeah. So, but you're, you're one of her favorite people. So I, I didn't think anything about it as far as like, she loves I'm super flattered

Curt:

by that too. Um, so what else would you have people know about the real estate market? You want to give some words of wisdom, um, that are pertinent. We got some stagflation that coming. Yeah. Uh, but we we'll talk about that in the politics section.

You

Patrick:

know, I think the biggest thing that I've over over time, um, have learned about myself and my business is we're, you know, we're very fortunate that we're, we're, we're quite successful. But the one thing that, you know, that has allowed me to do is not worry about who wants to work with me or who doesn't wanna work with me. And the reason I'm saying all that is because this week when interest rates went to five or to 6.2, 5%, I had some stress and anxiety and I don't really have that. Jane asked me, are you okay? Like, I was like, I honestly don't know, you know, and right. I don't know what this looks like. We have a significant amount of business that we're, we're very fortunate to have. We have a strong, strong client base that we're very active

Curt:

in. Oh, you got a rental portfolio with equity in it. Yes. If this,

Patrick:

you know, we should be good, but like I, I told my guys, we had a Tuesday morning meeting and I told my guys, I said, Hey, we've got X dollars closing in July, which is a significant amount of dollars and commissions coming in. But plan to not close another deal this year. Not to say that that won't, that will happen.

Curt:

Right. It probably won't happen, but, but we don't know, don't spend it all in one place when we have this big

Patrick:

month. And, um, yeah, I'm very adamant, you know, one of the things that I, I'm not a traditional brokerage, I don't, you know, a traditional brokerage goes and recruits agents. Um, they, you know, I don't, I. I love the group. So this is not a, a downplay on the group. I, I, I have a lot of friends at the group, but the group is not. That's kind of the point of a

Curt:

lot of brokerages is get more agents exactly. In our team, the

Patrick:

group isn't in the business of selling houses, the group is in the business of getting more agents for, to go sell houses. Yeah. Those agents businesses to go sell houses. Whereas at ska real estate services, we are all active producers and we have two full-time assistants, our sorry, one full-time assistant one part-time assistant, but the three of us are full-time producing. And you know, that being said, our business is to us to sell houses. And you're not looking for realtors. No, we are not looking for realtors. And it, I, you know, but I take a lot of ownership and everyone's success and everybody's financial ability to live the life they want. I had my assistant at 23 buy a house last year, who was extremely that's awesome. That's and I said, Mel, you're good. And you're gonna represent yourself. I'm I'm li I got her license when she came on. I said, no, you're getting licensed. I'm gonna pay for it. And I'm getting my other assistant licensed and paying for that. And, you know, I, my goal is to have impacts in their lives, in a positive way to where each one of them are successful in whatever success means to them. And it was never my intention to have a company of five. It was, I was gonna be a solo dude doing my own thing. And I got so busy that I needed help on the assistant. Yeah, I got so, and then I had a couple people come in and wanna work for me,

Curt:

so, well, if you can keep building that Rainmaker mechanism of, of just market expertise and things like that, do you have fun? Like, do you love, were you a class clowny kind of guy, or is it a necessity? Like when you're making these videos, scripting them, it work

Patrick:

it's, it's all,

Janey:

it's naturally.

Patrick:

But maybe not. Yeah, exactly. But it was actually, you know, if you were to look through my YouTube videos, especially the first, probably five to 10, like, it was about as dull as it got and like hard to watch and it was actually one of my, it was actually my assistant who made a comment and she goes, maybe you should smile. And I like, so I like made it an intention to smile and after 200, you know, videos that I've, it gets pretty easy. Huh? It gets easy. Still takes work. Yeah. And, um, you know, fortunate to have like people like Jene on there. You've been on a couple

Curt:

times I've seen, I've seen your face.

Patrick:

She actually does great, you know, like, honestly, for sure, like for, for as, um, maybe nervous as she might appear, she presents very well. She's very intelligent, very well spoken and has a very cool story that is very, you know, engaging and captures people's attentions. So without, uh, too much effort, she, she does a great job.

Curt:

Yeah. Very cool. Well, do you guys wanna jump into the closing segments? Is there anything else along the, the Olympic career journey or things, I guess you kind of got, well, we'll talk about family here in a minute and you guys got a bunch of ankle biters running around there. yeah. We'll talk about that. Um, were there any other highlights or you kind of have been momming mostly and then working occupational therapy kind of part-time is that yep. Fulfilling to you? Do you enjoy that

Janey:

work? Absolutely. It's uh, my other dream job, I mean, I really get to get people who come in on a gurney, not able to breathe on event and see them walk out with a, a

Patrick:

Walker is, is. I mean, that's

Curt:

pretty cool. Can't beat it. So, yeah. So, um, we always talk about faith, family and politics, uh, who wants to start and on which topic?

Patrick:

Um, yeah, I'll start faith. Faith might be a quick one. Sure. Um, I would say we are both faith based. Um, we, I was raised Catholic Uhhuh. Um, it was, we had a very unfortunate, uh, experience at one of the churches here that put a really very poor taste in my mouth. Like together you did together. We did and made us, I was like, you know what, no, I'm, we're gonna go be kind of a non-denominational Christian. Yeah. And, you know, we go to church very infrequently. Um, but I would say we are both faith-based Christians. Yeah. That, um, know put a lot of faith in God and, you know, grateful for

Curt:

the opportunity here in a year or two, when the kids are getting ready to ask for that and they wanna be in Sunday school or things, you might. Get more involved maybe. No. Yeah.

Patrick:

I don't know. I kind of

Janey:

wanna get more involved now just because of that community, you

Curt:

know, that's what I see a lot. Like it's easy for single no kid or not, I mean, not single, no kids, but married, no kids, people to kind of ignore church, but then when their kids become like seven, five and three or whatever, you're like, oh, where are they gonna learn? Like all the deep stuff. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So, um, kind of a, a former Catholic searching a little bit. Is that your perspective then Patrick currently?

Patrick:

Yeah. Uh, no. I would say I'm very strong in what I believe.

Curt:

Believe your faith, but haven't found your church or do you have a church home that you call home now?

Patrick:

We used to, but not really. No. Yeah. Since COVID

Janey:

everything just kind of fell apart and we just never restarted back up. Yeah. Um, not that we don't have any attentions to, to

Curt:

for what it's worth. Our church was one of the first to come back into in person mm-hmm

Patrick:

yeah. anyway, I digres, she listens to church online. She has a, she has a, a pastor that she really enjoys listening to. And I, for what, you know, haven't really been to either church or listen to an online service in probably two years.

Curt:

Okay. Fair enough. Yeah. Well I'll, uh, Sundays at 10 is when our church meets, if you ever join us Jenay, tell me about your background. Uh, were you, I grew up in the church, three different, three different places, same kind of church, same kind of church,

Janey:

usually a Baptist church, Christian Church. somewhere on the base where we were at as well. Sure. Um, you know, I grew up with, you know, Sunday school, we had, you know, choir, we had everything. My, my mom was a choir teacher when I was young. And so I, I, I grew up in the church and that's kind of where I was, but yeah, as I got a little bit older and, you know, had an older brother who was a little wayward, um, you start to question things, you start to kind wonder how things go. And so I started to believe more in just my faith personally, as opposed to organized religion. So, um, that's kind of the journey

Curt:

I ended up on. I like, that's why I say faith instead of religion. Mm-hmm because religion is kind of gross. Yeah. but faith is kind of awesome. Mm-hmm yeah. Is kind of the, what I think about that. Um, I went to, I, I went to the, the black church one time here in Fort Collins. Have you ever been, I have not. Uh, the, where is this? Uh, it's the code of many colors. What Absa, there's a word. Uh, anyway, what it means is the code of many colors and, and it's like a kind of old school, like worship stand and clap your hands. It's, uh, kind of shields and, um, I guess Taft, maybe shields and Taft somewhere right over there. Uh, I, uh, I was, uh, one of the pastor actually became a member of my rotary club for a while. Oh, Dave was his name and, uh, I decided to ride my bike to church and then, but my church is a long ways away. And so I was like, oh, there's Dave's church. I should just stop it here and go there. And I loved it. It was so like, Like he talked, he talked a message about like cell phones and the devil in our pocket kind of, and all the distraction that it is and stuff. And so like, my church is very much a, we read the Bible and we talk about it kind of thing. Yeah. And his was much more of a contemporary, like issues affecting us today kind of a topic. So anyway, I always

Janey:

call it preach, not teach. And the difference I feel between like, you know, traditional Christian, white churches versus black churches, I feel like they teach more like, here's the Bible. Here's what it says. Um, here are examples in the Bible and yes, it does relate to you, but it's harder to, to get what you need out of it versus a preach where you feel like they're speaking to you about what's relevant, what's here and what's now and what's going on.

Curt:

Yeah. And so, and which do you prefer? I prefer a preach. Yeah. Yeah. It's kind of inspiring, right? Like it's easy to know the right thing to do. It's not always easy to be inspired to do it. Right. Yeah. Mm-hmm fair enough. Mm-hmm anything that you would like to add on topic of. not right now. No. So let's move on. Let's talk about your family. Uh, you guys have three littles. Is that right? Three

Janey:

littles. We got a, a daughter she's four years old. Her name's NOLA. Okay. Our son Rocky he's two and a half years old. And our newest who's three months old. His

Curt:

name's Boone Boone. Mm-hmm I love it. I remember, uh, by the way, there's a four local thing. Tank patio cups there, because I, I have, I know that small children love plastic cups and also I'm maybe, maybe you'll have one more. Absolutely happy

Patrick:

potato. Thank you. he'll tell you. No, now

Curt:

me. So, oh, what I enjoyed it might be hardest with the youngest, but maybe not. I like, uh, asking for a one word description on about each of your kids. Oh, I like it. Yeah. I'm curious. I go second. Okay. Um, Janay.

Janey:

Oh, my daughter, um,

Curt:

fierce. Oh, that was exactly the word chosen by my most recent guest. Clint, Jasper. Yeah. For his daughter

Janey:

fierce for my daughter, Rocky. Oh, he's

Curt:

sweet. He's adorable. By the way. He's gotta be the cutest

Janey:

kid. Yeah. If I use two words for my glasses, he's a great sleeper. Oh, that's

Curt:

sweet. you could use that. That's all great sleeper. That's amazing. We're the other two. Not so easy and not so not so

Janey:

great with

Curt:

sleeping. Yeah. I

Patrick:

would do, uh, tornado for

Curt:

NOLA fierce tornado. That sounds, uh, yeah. Charming.

Patrick:

Yes. In all the right ways. Yeah. Uh, and then Rocky, you know, if it's not sweet, it would be. Loving. Oh, wow. Yeah. It's tender heart. He is. Oh yeah. He's he'll steal you real quick. Um, and then Boone is like, I would say smiley, you know, for me, comparatively to the other two, he is very smiley, which I don't connect with. Baby babies nearly as much as, as

Curt:

Jane does. Yeah. Talk to me when you're two

Patrick:

Yeah, like literally like Rocky didn't like me until he was about 18 months old. Like he'd deal with me, but like, you know, he'd be like, who are you

Curt:

go? I'm not interested.

Patrick:

Really NOLA is, you know, she and I have this special, special bond, but Boone he's a not. Not nearly as special of a bond as Noah, but not nearly, not even close to what Rocky and I's relationship was. He likes being, I can put him to sleep. I can hold him. I can feed him. It's it's special. So that's cool. So he smiles at me a lot more so smiley.

Curt:

Isn't it fun? How like every child has its own kind of highly diverse personality, even though every one of 'em will be your children as they grow. Mm-hmm mm-hmm you mentioned your, your dad and your mom, uh, variously, Jenay. Um, do you want to shine a little love on them? I think it was William Deloche WD 40 mm-hmm Uh, anything else that you'd like to share about your dad? He did an air force career. And what's he? Where is he at now? What are they doing? Is he still with us? He's

Janey:

yes. He's, uh, he works on actually the military base. He retired at, um, okay. He does, um, contracting for a company. And so he still, and where is that?

Patrick:

In California.

Curt:

Okay. Yeah. Um, when you gonna drag him out here to Colorado,

Janey:

I've been trying since I moved out here and they just haven't gone. Just

Curt:

resistant. Yeah. Even after the last couple of years, he's still resistant. Yes. Dang. Yes. I've been

Janey:

still trying stubborn, like, come on. Especially when you know,

Patrick:

we were, her brother lives out here and

Curt:

yeah. Well, keep working on him. It, it seems likely. Yeah. And your mom?

Janey:

Yeah, she, she works on the base as well. She does. She just told me the other day. I couldn't tell you I couldn't even remember

Patrick:

project management, project management. Do

you

Curt:

want to, uh, what's her name? DD de de de DEO. And anything else about your family? You wanna talk your brothers a little bit or anything like that?

Janey:

Um, a little brother is, uh, he's out here buying his first

Patrick:

house closes June 21st. Yeah, he's kinda, is

Curt:

he a good realtor in the world? Not me. No, you okay. that's cool. Where's

Janey:

he at? Um, I guess close to Longmont is

Patrick:

where he is at right now. Okay. Yeah, no, that's north Glen. Okay. Is

it?

Curt:

Yeah. you'll see him soon. I've never been there. not yet. Well, he just bought it and, uh, your other brother, right? My older brother. We,

Janey:

we don't talk. Oh yeah. So I don't even know where he's at. I know he is in California, but

Curt:

oh, I'm sorry to hear that. That's hard. Um, Patrick, what else do you wanna say about family?

Patrick:

Yeah. You know, I mean, I, I grew up kind of in a, I would say a traditional patriarchal family that my dad, you know, he was working, um, or, or not necessarily, I mean, he was home. He never missed any sporting events. Oh really? But my mom kind of did everything with us. Yeah. And, uh, that worked. That was great. You know, I, you know, love my dad deeply. He's I talk with him every morning for at least 20, 30 minutes. Really. Wow. Yeah. And so it's a special, special relationship that that's cool. What's his name? Uh, Kevin. And you

Curt:

wanna do a one more description of Kevin?

Patrick:

One more description of Kevin is, uh,

Curt:

Tough tough. I like it. He's tough. Sorry. That's kind of rude. Cut off guarded that way. Tough in, in a lot of the that's cool that you had that relationship. Like, I think I have a good relationship with my dad, but I just talked to him the other day and we realized it'd been like 10 days or two weeks, you know, I hadn't talked to him in a little

Patrick:

while. Yeah. I mean, pretty much spent the week you talked daily, but like the one thing that I. Will be a little bit different on it. Me and my dad, I could say we've probably hugged or shook hands maybe once or twice in the last, like two years. Wow. Like we're not very affectionate as far as physical touch goes and I'm very affectionate and that's a lot to do with Jena is because she came from a very affectionate touchy, feely household. And that's yeah. Something that I really want to, you know, impart on our kids is like, that's okay. Right. And then don't have to be too tough. I still try not to cry. Not because like, I don't know why it's like an internal deal. Oh.

Curt:

I cried in half my podcast recordings. I haven't gone there yet today, but

Patrick:

yeah. And so I, I don't know why, but like, I'll get teary and try to hold it back. But like, I'm all about, you know, having some tenderness and vulnerability, but then being strong, whether you're a woman

Curt:

or a man. Fair. Yeah. I'm kind of a cry and charge on anyway kind of guy. Oh, like it. Um, and your mom,

Patrick:

uh, she is, um, uh, she's in town. She's travels quite a bit. Um, She has a boyfriend that she's been with for about eight, nine years. Good guy. Yeah. Um, I

Curt:

saw her a couple years ago, maybe just before the COVID or something. It was nice to see.

Patrick:

Yeah, she she's doing well. Um, she watches the kids every now and then, but she does a lot of traveling, which is great. Right. Um, but yeah, she's, um, you know, wants to spend time with kids.

Curt:

Let's talk about politics. Shall we? Yeah, I, I was just looking at a graph of, uh, of, uh, Joe Biden's like approval disapproval ratings. Yeah. Since, uh, since he took office and it like graphs, tell a big story. It's they're divergent lines. We'll just say that mm-hmm um, What, what do you think he should do at this point? Other than resign? No, just kidding. That's rude.

Patrick:

well, I can, yeah. You know, Janine and I, we stay outta politics quite a bit, but I will say, excuse me, I will say that I kind of grew up in a very staunch red house, conservative, Republican type deal. Like that was just the background of, you know, historical Fort Collins, male type, dominant type deal. And, and that's just, you know, you almost like take. And move on until you have you form your own opinions. Sure. And when, again, you know, probably one of the big things that Jena and I, that there was, there was a time in 2012, I couldn't believe she was gonna vote for Barack Obama. And I, I think, oh really? Yeah.

Curt:

But I would've vote. I, I almost voted for him cuz he was pretty pretty fly. I mean, I, I just, but yeah, you were kind of like wired, conservative and that's exactly. Anybody doesn't think that way is dumb. Exactly.

Patrick:

So I was hardwired. Yeah. And you know, again, anger, you know, like how could you type deal? Like we're, we're married. You do what I say type deal. Gosh, not that I, and that went over like a far in church. Not necessarily, I, I didn't necessarily say that, but I would say like my actions spoke that. Right, right, right. And so, um, but since that time I would just. You know, we are involved I'm, I'm trying to get a lot more involved with city politics. Yeah. Not necessarily like by, by any means like going out and like you're gonna run for city council. No, never in a million years. but paying more attention to what's impacting our lives. Yeah. You know, directly, um, not that, you know, national politics don't no, I'm

Curt:

playing with the Biden jokes. It's just, uh, fun to put you on the

Patrick:

spot. But no, I mean, I, you know, I vote for the first time in my life voted for Biden in 2000, whatever that was 20. Yeah. And it was really, really difficult. And I can tell you that all my, I, I told my uncle, I told my, and that's talk about very difficult. Right. Because they actually

Curt:

be open about that.

Patrick:

Oh yeah. And I mean, that's awesome. I'm not necessarily saying that, like, I'm excited that I made that vote at this point. Um,

Curt:

right. The one of the most popular activities across the country is scraping off Biden bumper stickers the last two months. Really see.

Patrick:

Yeah. I, I don't know. I imagine, you know, but you know, that was really difficult for me. I, um, I, I admire

Curt:

your courage

Patrick:

though, because yeah, and for me it was more not voting. It was making a stance against voting for Donald Trump, which, you know, something for sure. Maybe some of his policies you could, I voted for

Curt:

Kanye, so good. Yeah. You know, I couldn't vote for orange man bad or

Patrick:

it was raising old man dumb. Yeah. It was, for me, it was raising a half black, you know, family and being married to a black woman. And, you know, do you think Republicans

Curt:

are actually opposed to equal rights for blacks? I don't

Patrick:

necessarily think Republicans by any means. No, but I think for conservatives, I think Donald Trump, you know, he showed some things that just, just didn't sit. Well, I wouldn't say that's fair. He was openly like racist. I wouldn't, you wouldn't. I, I,

Curt:

his black friends don't seem to think

Patrick:

he's very racist. yeah. Yeah, exactly. And so like, and like, I would, I I'd argue that, that he wasn't either, but like just some of the things that he said just kind of were concerning to me off putting enough to where having

Curt:

kids. I mean, I didn't vote for him for a reason

Patrick:

too. Yeah. Having kids, I just was like, no, I just, I didn't do it. And in 2016, I voted for one of the, one of the, um, one of the third parties. Gary Johnson. Yeah. One of

Curt:

those, the libertarian, the other one. No, the green party,

Patrick:

no, something like that. Doesn't matter. Yeah. I voted for one of them, but like at this, when this one came, it was more of making a stance. Like

Curt:

what are your principles and values, uh, by which you would judge, whether a politician is serving well, can we say honest? yeah. I mean, it's gonna eliminate a lot, almost

Patrick:

all of 'em, but I don't know. We, I think Jene and attest that we try to live our life through honesty, character, and hard work, you know, I think that's kind of like some values that drive us.

Curt:

Yeah. Jene. What would you like to say about this topic?

Janey:

I'm pretty much hands off when it comes to politics stuff. Like I, you know, I, I do have my beliefs and, you know, I feel a certain way about some things, but I feel like, you know, not everybody's an enemy, you know, not everybody's against each other. So I mean, common ground and you find those common grounds and you try to make things work out. That's how I feel about things. And

Curt:

I don't get to talk to black women or men very frequently, like talk to me about like the race relation thing. Obviously 20, 20 summer of 2020 is still pretty fresh. And you know, most outside observers would be like, so what change exactly. Except for Portland downtown sucks and Denver downtown sucks and they've wrecked Chicago and Detroit. And you know, there hasn't been a lot accomplished there except for broken businesses and more broken families than before.

Janey:

Yeah. And that's a problem. Nothing has really changed. Anything has kind of stayed the same. Um, I mean as a black woman and having, you know, my family, it's like, my brother lives in Denver, you know, I worry about him, you know? Yeah. He's, he's a licensed to carry and he carries, but someone might, you know, think otherwise about other people about him

Curt:

and, and he could be, so you worry about him as far as being a, like a victim of a yeah. Cop shooting or something like that, just as a black man, you think I worry about, so you would say that yes, there is like intentional discrimination against black people in many police departments, for example.

Janey:

But then again, every, every department's different, every person within that department is different. And so it just depends. And

Curt:

you never know. Yeah. Is it 7% of the police force or is it 70% of the police force? Cause it makes a big difference. Right? Mm-hmm and it should be zero, right?

Janey:

It's not, it never

Curt:

will be what, like if you were running for office, which doesn't seem like it is your future, if you were running for office, like what are some of the like actual changes, like cuz there's, you know, there's everything from. Paying reparations and making big apologies and things like that down to, you know, I've heard, oh, uh, Morgan Freeman forever ago had an interview where he was like, let's just stop talking about race. Like, don't put the little check I've stopped, actually checking the me too. The boxes about what gender, what I, I don't self-identify as anything I'm like, I prefer not to answer.

Janey:

It's irrelevant. Yeah. All of that's irrelevant. I mean, we are people yeah. That we can procreate with everyone else if we couldn't. And there would actually be a real difference. Right. If that were the case, but I mean, we are who we are and, and I'm like, like you said, I don't check a box cuz it's, you know, it doesn't mean anything

Curt:

to any of us. So go back to that question. Like how could we get this conversation back onto a better track? I know it's a super hard question. It's like, how should we fix the abortion issue? Or, you know, whatever, like, but like in your impression, so it kind of focus less on, it would be better than Worster. Yeah.

Janey:

I, I mean, we are different. We have to acknowledge that we, I have brown skin and you don't, you know, that's something we can't, you know, take away and all the stuff that we've done, like let's tear down these statues and all that stuff. I don't think we need to change any of stuff. We just need to educate people. We just need to show people that this is what happened. Like, like they make their own opinions as opposed to skewing it in a certain light so that people can think, you know, one

Curt:

way, or I think it's better if we're proud of our historic country while acknowledging some stupidity. Right? Yes, absolutely. Um, well, thanks for sharing that. I, I appreciate that sentiment as well. And you know, I don't, what would you say about that issue, Patrick? Cuz you see it from a, probably a more informed that's when been one of my biggest learnings is as I, cause I do have, you know, like four black friends in town or whatever, but as I've explored conversations with them and such, it's like, because I grew up in North Dakota where there just period wasn't any black people. Like I, I, I, and I feel like I'm. Like, I wouldn't identify as an anti-racist, but I feel like I'm as colorblind as most people you're gonna meet. And yet I recognize that I was ignorant to the level of discrimination, even in like Fort Collins, high schools and things like that. I've heard of my friends saying that they're teenage kids, you know, get called names and things like that. And I, I would, I was kind of like, oh, I guess I'm kind of ignorant, you know?

Patrick:

Yeah. I think, uh, it's tough, you know? Um, I would say I've had a lot of learning because Janne, you know, she's about as open-minded as it gets, like, as I said it, I mean, I'm a white redheaded freshman at CSU, you know, with no accolades in track and field. And she opens her mind an idea of, I like him. Yeah. You know, so like completely different, you know, but paralleled of. Not, I like him too. Not, not, not seeing in a different way. not seeing things in that light. Um, but Jene has kind of not snapped at me, but she has made it very apparent that corrected you fiercely. Yes, firmly. She, she said, I do not go seek it. I do not look for it. But when it is there, I will let you know. And when it happens, I need you to back me 100% and cuz one of the worst things that I can say that I've said in the past is, well, maybe he meant X or maybe she meant Y and she goes, no, that's not what the intention was not defending that statement. And it it's been a big aha of. You know, not thinking that I know best, but just supporting and understanding that yeah, there's still that out there, whether it is, um, intentional or unintentional, it happens. And there's a lot of perspective that, you know, needs to be understood and just openness to, maybe there's still some of that out here. Maybe it's not necessarily meant to be so forthcoming, but, uh, it is still there and there's still some work to be done. We've come a long ways. But like Jenay said, you know, let's educate and help people make their own decisions. If you wanna be a racist Dick, then be a racist Dick. But, but don't move to Fort Collins. Yeah. Don't, don't, you know, doesn't mean that I have to like you

Curt:

well, and, and frankly, like, it's not like we have that big a listenership or whatever, but if you're a black person living somewhere in the country, that's hardworking, kind honest and has high integrity, please move here. Yeah. Like, seriously, it's gonna be hard cuz it's too freaking expensive, but it would be so good for like, I. 80%, 90%, probably 90 plus percent of our community would love to color up a little bit. Yeah. With

Patrick:

great people. Well, and I can tell you that one of the things that I've most enjoyed about working with transplants and people moving into Fort Collins is it's really high, you know, increasing diversity, well, increasing diversity, hard workers, high earners, right. Highly intelligent individuals. And I think one of the things that Jena could attest to with my life, one of the things that I've struggled with is finding a tribe that like, I like call friends and wanna hang out with that, you know, that want talk about business and I'm kind of lazy

Curt:

for you. Like we can't really hang out cuz you work out too hard for me. I got a little belly.

Patrick:

No, which I'm actually really excited about joining Loco think tank is because again, it's just finding these tribes and like you said, you know, I think, uh, you know, with open arms, we'd welcome people who want to. add to the culture and community and not suck from it. Right. And bring, not come and take, but exactly provide which I think there's a lot. I, I had, you know, one, one person, friend of mine who listens to our podcast, probably like one of the five, I think you got at least 10 minutes.

Curt:

Maybe you've been working on it for a while. And, and she

Patrick:

goes, you're probably beating me. I listen to everyone of your podcasts. And, and she's from, they're from Texas. I listen. And she's, uh, Cuban Cuban background. Yeah. And I listen to everyone of your, your podcasts. And I, I can't wait to get involved. I, I love the one with Darren bury and I can't wait to get involved with the city of Fort Collins, some community events and, you know, give back. I mean like how cool is that, that people are coming from Texas that immediately feel inclined to help push Fort Collins forward. I love it.

Curt:

Yeah. Love it. Have you thought about your local experiences, the Loco experience? Can I share, I wanna share a Loco experience that I had this isn't my Loco experience, not the craziest, but. at a red rocks concert at a three 11 show. I was on the side where there was those huge, like seven foot drop off concrete things and whatever you've been to red rocks, I assume you haven't. Oh, you, you have to go to red rocks with us. It was a double date when you're three month old is more like a year Um, so anyway, there's this huge wall. And this one drunk guy, like pushed this other drunk guy off the wall and it knocked down two ladies nearby us. One of them who was black and looked almost like you actually in recollection. And so I helped them up and I knew this one, the bad guy was gonna be an aggressor. So I went down to the security, uh, the, the station and there, there wasn't security there, but I said, Hey, there's a situation brew and you need to send security up to, uh, the side over here, right up there. And so I went and I go going back up the stairs and as I'm going back up the stairs, the aggressor guy did a running punch. Of the other guy that had gotten pushed off the thing. Oh, geez. Hit him square, knocked him down a flight of stairs at red rocks, like 16 steps. And he hit him so hard that he fell down to his hands and knees. The puncher did the aggressor and I jumped up on top of the guy, oh my God. And held him down. That hurt. He was trying to get up. He was like 240 pounds barrel chested. And I he's like trying to get up and I'm knocking his hands out from underneath him. And it faces go back down to the ground. And he tried on the other hand kick his foot out from underneath him. And I wrote him like a cowboy and Jill's freaking out. She's like right over here heading to these girls. Oh God. And a few minutes later, this like probably 30 seconds later, but it seemed like a while. Cause I'm riding this big guy. eight seconds. And, uh, ed, they kicked him out. Like he assaulted a guy in a way that could have killed him. Sure. And I couldn't believe that what they did in response to that was kicked him out. Wow. And it kind of makes me angry still. So anyway, there's my, one of my, I've got about a dozen stories like that. Um, so you don't have to feel like a topic, but if you can, it

Patrick:

would be cool. I'm gonna jump in. I'm boring. So yeah, I'll jump in watch and I think a lot of more, but, um, yeah, I would say just, you know, and it's tough to, I kind of thought about it before, when I was coming here, but I would say, um, grew up in Fort Collins, you know, predominantly white and a very affluent family and Janna, and I got divorced and I always was a redhead, anger type deal. So I got in a lot of fights growing up, a lot of, you know, street flights and things like that. Not

Curt:

me, I've never repeating anybody up that was like out of character

Patrick:

for me. And, but when Janna and I were married, you know, all that goes to the wayside. I mean, there was some times that I got aggress aggressive. Um, but when we got divorced, I actually started a box. Oh, and amateurly, you know, for USA, amateur boxing. Sure. And, uh, with the intention of going in there and, and fighting. And so I trained and I knew I didn. I didn't wanna go work out at a titled gym where you go in there and it's, you know, oh, right. Left, right joke. You know, I wanted to go in there where sweat and grinding kids and, you know, folks were fighting to get out of somewhere. So I went and found this sweaty greasy, gross gym in Greeley and went there for four days a week. Okay. The coach, when I walked in, said, you're, you're not gonna get into the gym until I said, you're ready. All right. Ready? Which ended up. Yep, exactly. This who's this privileged little shit. That's walking into my gym and it took me probably three or four months to gain the trust of all these guys that have been training for many years. But they're like, oh shit, he's actually coming. And he's committed. Yeah. He can take a punch to the face. He's willing to give a punch too. And it took me six months and we went to this tiny little gym in Kansas, you know, me and five guys, we got into a bus I'm and I'm 20 God dang 24, 25 at this time. And all these kids are. 15 16, 17 years old. I'm this older dude and have no Des desire, no need interesting to have to do this, but it was within me that I wanted to. And so I went to Kansas and I fought heavy weight. And because there was nobody in my weight class, so I was like, I'm fighting today. And so I fought heavy weight, a weight class up and, uh, ended up being, it was just three rounds. It was amateur fighting, um, and came away with the victory. It nice. And it was just, you know, just you're one and O I was, I I'm one and one. So after the second fight, uh, that was kind of when me and Janea started really started talking again. So I kind of like, you know, maybe shouldn't necessarily backed out on the, to do this. And I also, it was a good thing that I lost my second fight, cuz if I would've won, I would've for sure. Fought a third time. And then who knows what you know, been from there, but yeah, having

Curt:

maybe a little Emma maker in your next chapter. No, got a broken

Patrick:

knee. So, uh, fair. But you know, anybody who's ever heard the bell ring. And then go out there and fight another grown male. Cause that he was, he was 20 years old, 21 years old, 200, some odd pounds and I'm wow. 170, you know, right. 25, whatever. And, and uh, but anybody who gets in the ring, it's, it's a, it's a surreal

Curt:

experience. I can only imagine so far. Uh, and I don't think I'll ever imagine otherwise. Yeah. Yeah. So that's

Patrick:

my let experience.

Curt:

Thank you, Janine. You got nothing. I

Janey:

was seriously tracking my brain, trying to think of something like crazy that I've done. And it made me kind of sad cuz I feel like I'm really boring now, but I mean,

Curt:

well I put acid in your water bottle actually. So you're gonna go in on a 12 hour trip right now. Yeah, no, I'm kidding.

Janey:

I don't have any

Curt:

fun. Well, being married to this guy is a pretty crazy experience. Probably

Janey:

it has been, it's been a up and down. Journey

Patrick:

for us, but perspective is important too, because Janne, she traveled out of a suitcase going back and forth through Europe, talking to people with not speaking different language than her having to navigate different countries, different airports. Yeah. And so, you know, her perspective of CRA what's crazy. A

Curt:

little different, right? Yeah. Well, and it was very, but it was very focused. Mm-hmm you know, I think, uh, that's probably one thing that's like, one of the reasons I started local think tank is cuz I'm pretty accountable to other people because I like them and stuff, but I'm not very self disciplined or accountable to myself. And so when you're building a business, it's nice to have other people say, Hey bear, did you get that thing done yet? That you said you were gonna do? And uh, we're like opposite land in that regard. I think in a lot of ways, which means you don't have those crazy experiences where you're like, somebody's gotta stop this dumb ass. That's attacking people here. Yeah. Well, if you get your opportunity, uh, Jumping that guy's back if he needs it.

Patrick:

that's pretty awesome. I mean, honestly, that's how old you do it. I

Curt:

was 40. Geez. I mean, that's what made you do it? Good for you? I I'm a justice enforcer fight or flight. I can't not like do something if I see something that is an injustice. That's great. I mean, I might get shot for it someday, but

Patrick:

good for you. Won't

Curt:

change. That's pretty awesome. Good for you. Um, if people wanna learn about sup real estate, where should they go

Patrick:

for me? Um, pretty active on Instagram. Um, that's probably the, the main, is it sup real estate? Is it Patrick? Sup it's Patrick soup. Yeah. Um, and that's where I'm pretty active and, uh, kind of fun to grow a little

Curt:

community. Yeah. You have a YouTube channel as well. Pretty easy to find. I imagine. Yeah. Living in Fort COLS, uh, Jana. Do you want people to find you

Janey:

Uh, they can. I'm just Jana Delo actually on Instagram. Okay. They want to, they can come see when'm doing with my life. Yeah.

Curt:

Are you, uh, Coaching or doing anything else with regards to your career? Not right

Janey:

now. No. Also since pandemic haven't been able to get back to okay. CSU to do any of the coaching that I was doing. Okay. And plus

Curt:

three kiddos. So yeah, you get, you get an excuse, but I can see that you would be, uh, such a great servant in the world of like helping young ladies, especially believe in themselves and have a heart for discipline. Well,

Patrick:

well, let's put it this way. I, I have 200 videos. The, my best performing video has 14,000 views. She does have an online coaching program that was sought out by somebody else. But her average view is 250,000. Wow. So, uh, you know, it's like me, I'm again, you know, looking at like at the athlete, like in like something that I'm trying super hard on, I'm like, I'm never gonna jump that fire. Right. You know, or you do like, I'm spending 10 hours of video and she's just crushing. So, you know, she's again very humble when,

Curt:

uh, when you don't have any under twos and you feel like, uh, launching some kind of a coaching. Enterprise or summer camp thing or things like that. We, uh, we'll get you into a Freethink here and process that a little bit. Yeah. Because I believe you have a lot, lot to add to that community yet

Janey:

as well. I do, I do too. It just has to be the right timing. Yeah.

Curt:

understood. Well, again, I'm blessed and honored by your presence here today. I look forward to the next time that we can spend time together and, uh, I appreciate the time today. Thank you very much. Thank you. God. Speak to both K today. We're gonna come back on and have you tell your local experience here? Um, why don't you just start

Janey:

it? Um, well, I was in Monaco. One of the actually prettiest meets I've ever been to. It's beautiful out there. And, um,

Curt:

this is circa win.

Janey:

This was in 2012 or 13. So one, one of those years. Yeah. And, um, When you get to go to Monica to one of the best meets you're, you're doing pretty well. So all the athletes that are there, gold medalists, yeah. Meets silver and bronze medalist. So they're all pretty good. And I went out with this 400 meter, her 400 meter hurdler, and it was a big group of us that went out and, and the drinks started going and I had one, two can't count how many I had. And next thing you know, I'm passing drinks off and I'm getting, you know, pretty wasted. And I remember looking at my friend, Brittany Reese, and going I'm so drunk. Like I can't remember where the hotel is and she said, it's okay. It's okay. I got you. And so I stumbled out of.

Curt:

I think we're at a bar. Isn't it fun when you're not quite sure where the next foot goes. You're just like, I know I'm going that way. Yeah. She was

Janey:

holding me up. I was, it was pretty bad. And um, thanks Brittany. Yeah. at night we find our way back to the hotel and I pretty much hugged the toilet that whole night. Oh. Um, knowing we had a pretty early flight to catch and so I had to pack my bag. I'm sure I left some stuff and got in the car. Oh, I remember now too. I also, um, threw up in the bus. Oh. And I remember someone going, oh, I heard that. And I, I just slid in my chair and I slid down in my chair thinking I hope no one knows that was me. And, uh, we got to the airport and, um, I probably hugged a couple of trash cans there as well. Oh, that's rough. Remember I passed out and when I woke up, I was at the next place I had gotten on an airplane. I had. Made it to the next destination. Oh my. And had no idea how I'd gotten there. I was like, I don't know if you bags on the plane. I don't know anything. I had no memory of it whatsoever.

Curt:

Did you have a traveling buddy or

Janey:

anything be like, uh, no. I was by myself. I, I was going to meet up with, uh, the rest of the team. Um, and it was just kind of a holding location where we could train and stuff. And I remember I didn't come out for a few days and they said, man, what were you doing? And I said, I, I had a rough night with one of the 400 meter hurdle. I'll go, oh, we know who that is.

Curt:

long. So to the one young ladies listening, this is a warning, not a story of inspiration here. The inspiration part we already

Patrick:

passed and also side note where Kurt and I are drinking some whiskey here while Janna's got a 24 ounce gallon of water sitting next to whatever bore

Curt:

next time we'll have red wine in the next podcast. Oh, I'll be

Janey:

giggling then.

Curt:

well, you're giggling. No, it gets worse. thanks guys. Appreciate you.